Welcome to AngelCode.com. Here you'll find resources for game development and more.

The most popular visits here are to the following pages: AngelScript - a powerful and free scripting library, BMFont - a free bitmap font generator, or RefDB - a database of useful developer resources. But feel free to browse the site for more resources.

AngelCode.com is maintained by Andreas Jönsson since 2001. Please help the continued maintainance and further development of the resources here with a donation.

Latest updates

New developer references

2014-10-09   HWiNFO
2014-10-09   A thousand ways to pack the bin
2014-10-05   Koyote Free Video Converter
2014-07-29   Geometric Tools
2014-07-28   Triangulation by Ear Clipping

2014-07-20   AngelScript 2.29.1

This is a quite small release compared to the previous ones. Still, it is an important one as it corrects a mistake in the last release regarding the syntax for named arguments.

In version 2.29.0 the support for naming the arguments when calling functions was implemented using the following syntax: func(arg1 = expr1, arg2 = expr2). The problem with this syntax was that it would not be obvious to the reader when an argument happened to have the same name as a variable.

So, I decided to change this syntax to use the following syntax instead: func(arg1: expr1, arg2: expr2). I'd like to think of it as labelling the arguments.

For those, who prefer the = token, or don't want break backwards compatibility I've added an engine property asEP_ALTER_SYNTAX_NAMED_ARGS that can be used to optionally support the previous syntax.

This release also brings a couple of other minor enhancement, such as the support for registering template types as value types, declaring script classes as abstract, and the inclusion of asGetTypeTraits() as part of the official SDK interface.

New developer references

2014-07-16   Online PDF Converter
2014-06-28   Zeal

2014-06-09   AngelScript 2.29.0

After an unusually long period a new version is finally out. This version comes with a number of smaller enhancements. Too many to list here, so if you want details, please check the change list.

The most important improvements are the following:

A new flag to support C++ array types: asOBJ_APP_ARRAY. This flag introduced for C++ types like the following: 'typedef float vec3f[3]', as this kind of types didn't follow the ordinary calling convention for classes nor primitives.

Thanks to GGLucas the script language now supports named arguments when calling functions. This means that you can now call a function using the following syntax: 'func(arg1 = expr, arg2 = expr2)' and so on. When this is done, the compiler will rearrange the arguments by their names so that the order matches the declaration. This works especially well together with default arguments, as you will be able to provide only a few of the arguments, leaving the rest with the default value.

Also thanks to GGLucas the script language now supports auto types in variable declarations with initialization expressions. Just like in C++ the compiler will deduce the type of the variable from whatever type the expression evaluates too.

I've implemented a new operator overload 'opHndlAssign'. Types registered with asOBJ_ASHANDLE should use this operator overload instead of the ordinary 'opAssign' to implement the handle assign operation. This together with an enhancement to asBEHAVE_VALUE_CAST to allow the generic form 'void f(?&out)' has allowed me to implement a nicer syntax for managing the values in the dictionary add-on:

  int val = int(dict['value']);
  dict['value'] = val + 1;
  obj @handle = cast<obj>(dict['handle']);
  if( handle is null )
    @dict['handle'] = object;

This should lend itself well for implementing a true 'variant' type. Perhaps that's even something I'll try for an upcoming release.

The engine has a couple of new callbacks calls RequestContext and ReturnContext. These callbacks can be used to implement context pooling for better performance, and they can also be used to pre-configure contexts that will be used internally by the engine, e.g. to debug script class destructors called from the garbage collector.

Jordi Oliveras Rovira has taken the time to implement support for functor calling conventions asCALL_THISCALL_OBJFIRST and asCALL_THISCALL_OBJLAST. These work similarly to the existing asCALL_THISCALL_ASGLOBAL where the application supplies the a pointer to the functor object that emulates the function/method that the script calls. With this it is now perfectly possible to use for example std::function to implement proxy/wrapper functions if so desired.